TBI Survivor Blog Series 2020 – Death-a-versary

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Death-a-versary

By Dhara Joshi

“I have been given a second chance at life, and really truly appreciate the things that make me happy. “

“Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase

Hakuna Matata! Ain’t no passing craze

It means no worries, for the rest of your days

It’s our problem-free philosophy

Hakuna Matata!”

No one says it better than Timon and Pumbaa from the Lion King. My accident has truly taught me that life is too short and fleeting, and that every day should be lived to its fullest. This is why every year on my accident anniversary, or my “death-a-versary”, as I like to so morbidly call it, I go out and celebrate life by kicking up my heels and painting the town red. Some years, it’s something as simple as remembering to stop and smell the roses. And on other years, I like to go more extravagant and throw myself a second birthday party. After all, it is my second birthday, which is how I like to treat it. The entire purpose of the day is to remember that I have been given a second chance at life, and really truly appreciate the things that make me happy. It’s my way of reveling in all that life has to offer.

For all intents and purposes, cheating death was like giving a giant middle finger to the unholy grim reaper. Long gone are the days of ventilators, gizmos, and gadgets keeping me alive. No more hollowed walls of the hospital keeping me in as a prisoner.  Instead, I now have the freedom, nay good fortune, to rejoice in all that life has to offer.  This is precisely why every year on my “death-a-versary”, I take the time to not only celebrate life, but to reflect on how far I have come and to remember that no matter how bleak a situation may seem, it can always be worse.

It is really all about perspective at the end of the day, and I have gained strength from all of the courageous, determined, and strong individuals that I have met along the way, to show me how far I have come. My “death-a-versary” is not a time to wallow in self-pity, and lament in everything I have lost, it is instead a time to appreciate all that I have and all that I have gained from these experiences. Hakuna Matata indeed.

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